Night at Via Faenza, Florence

A Summer night at Via Faenza, Florence

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Very Beginning of Jeremy Rolleston’s Book

Every time reading Jeremy Rolleston’s book A Life That Counts, I was amazed by the very beginning. Instantly I feel a source of energy and power. It’s from within. It’s a reminder-As humans we are as powerful as we want to be.

This portion is free from Amazon Book’s sample reading and I hope it won’t get me into trouble by sharing with everyone here.

“Our brain is more complex than the most powerful of computers and has more than 100 billion nerve cells. Within 6.5 square centimetres of each of our hands, we have 2.7 metres of blood vessels, 600 pain sensors, 9000 nerve endings, 36 heat sensors and 75 pressure sensors. On average, we breathe 25,000 times a day and 10 million times a year, which means we take about 600 million breaths during our lifetime.

On average, our heart beats about three billion times in our lifetime. An adult is made up of about 100 trillion cells, each one of which contains about one or two metres of DNA. The aorta, our largest artery, is almost the diameter of agarden hose. Our capillaries, on the other hand, are so small that 10 of them are equal to the thickness of a human hair.

The human brain is made up of about 30 billion cells, called neurones, and each neurone is capable of handling about a million bits of information. If we were to write down that information as a number, we’d include 6.5 million miles of zeroes that would stretch from earth to the moon and back 13 times.

Human bone is as strong as granite as a supporter of weight. A block of bone the size of a matchbox can support nine tonnes, and that’s four times as much as concrete can support.

We generate 100 billion red blood cells every day and about two million of them every second. Cna yuo raed tihs? So phaonmneal is the pweor of the hmuan mnid taht it dseno’t mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres are in a wrod; the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer are in the rghit pclae.

More than these mind-boggling statistics, though, is the fact that each of us is not only amazing; we’re uniquely amazing. You’re one of a kind, a ‘once in all history’ event. There’s no one else like you in the entire world. You’re completely unique. Sure, you might be similar to your brother or sister, and your environment and upbringing might’ve been similar to his or hers, but each of us is uniquely different with our own individual physical, mental and emotional characteristics. Not even identical twins are the same as each other.

This means you’re no accident or random event; your life matters, and you were born and fashioned on purpose and for a purpose. In my opinion, it’s this understanding that makes a difference because it is both the foundation and the impetus for wanting to explore and discover your unique dreams and purpose – after all, you’ll never live your best life with a question mark above your head. You have only one life, and it’s not a dress rehearsal!”